Media Kit

 

Taps Peer Mentorship Program Becomes Valuable Model for Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – April 14, 2014


ARLINGTON, VA – The peer mentoring model used by the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) will be utilized to create a new network to help military and veteran caregivers, according to an op-ed written by First Lady Michelle Obama and Second Lady Jill Biden, published on April 11, 2014 by Military Spouse Magazine.

In their op-ed, Obama and Biden announced that the Department of Defense is creating in-person caregiver peer forums at every military installation that serves wounded warriors and their caregivers around the world. They will also be creating online tools, so that caregivers who are not able to attend an in-person forum can connect to their peers as well.

The Elizabeth Dole Foundation, TAPS, and many other organizations are committing to train 10,000 caregiving peer mentors — a commitment that will reach 50,000 caregivers nationwide. This commitment will also serve to increase caregiver knowledge and use of information and services through the VA Caregiver Helpline and the National Resource Directory.

“It is gratifying to see our model for assisting families of fallen troops, now being replicated to help military and veteran families who are coping with illness or injury in service to our country,” said Bonnie Carroll, TAPS founder and military widow.

As part of the Joining Forces initiative and its ongoing efforts to engage all sectors of society to give our service members and their families opportunities and support, Obama and Biden hosted former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, former Senator Elizabeth Dole, caregivers of veterans and active duty service members and TAPS representatives at the White House to discuss ways to improve support and resources available for caregivers.

“Connecting people who have suffered and now live daily with trauma with others who share a common experience provides healing and support,” said Carroll.

“Just as the TAPS peer-based support model has assisted families of fallen troops for two decades, that model will now be used to train peer mentors and master trainers that assist caregivers for veterans and active duty service members.”

TAPS remains committed to providing comfort and care to anyone grieving the death of a loved one in military service to America.

About TAPS

The Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) is the national organization providing compassionate care for the families of America’s fallen military heroes and has offered support to more than 50,000 surviving family members of our fallen military and their caregivers since 1994. TAPS provides peer-based emotional support, grief and trauma resources, grief seminars and retreats for adults, Good Grief Camps for children, case work assistance, connections to community-based care, online and in-person support groups and a 24/7 resource and information helpline for all who have been affected by a death in the Armed Forces. Services are provided free of charge. For more information go to www.taps.org or call the toll-free TAPS resource and information helpline at 1.800.959.TAPS (8277).

Media Contact for TAPS: Ami Neiberger-Miller or James Hutton, 202.588.8277, ami@taps.org, james.hutton@taps.org

 

 

The Military Caregiver Network: Helping Our Nation’s Hidden Heroes

Bonnie Carroll, TAPS

In each generation, our nation has witnessed the selfless few who step forward to answer the call to duty and defend freedom both at home and abroad. Every day while serving they can be subjected to risks and toils that result in lifelong impacts upon their health. Wounds, illnesses and injuries stemming from service require ongoing care for many military service members and veterans. More often than not, this type of care is given not only by professionals or in institutions, but right at home by millions of family members — caregivers who are our hidden heroes.

Over 5.5 million caregivers support wounded, ill or injured military or veterans; 1.1 million (19.6 percent) of whom are caring for post-9/11 veterans. This selfless help promotes better quality lives and can result in improved rehabilitation and recovery. Yet playing this role can impose a substantial physical, emotional and financial toll on caregivers themselves. Many caregivers have to set aside their own career and life goals to provide the needed care and, unlike professionals, they usually provide this care without compensation and often without sufficient knowledge of, or access to, available resources or a support network.

A recent RAND Corporation report “Hidden Heroes, America’s Military Caregivers” commissioned by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation detailed the stories of selfless duty and sacrifice performed by family members who are serving as the caregiver for those who served our country. The report revealed that while all caregivers experience decline in personal health outcomes, greater strains in family relationships and more workplace problems than non-caregivers, these statistics were even higher for post-9/11 caregivers. A high percentage of which (53 percent) have no caregiving network despite their younger age. The report recommended that social support to these hidden heroes is urgently needed.

To address this critical need, the peer programs of the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) was applauded by the First Lady at the Joining Forces Initiative on April 11th as the model to shape the creation of a new Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network in conjunction with the Military Caregiver Coalition of the Elizabeth Dole Foundation. The Network’s core services, built on the TAPS peer mentor and peer support group model, was again reinforced last week during the First Lady’s announcement on April 30th of the new Council on Foundation’s Veteran Philanthropy Exchange and its emphasis on “sharing best practices.”

TAPS will create the Network in partnership with groups such as the Wounded Warrior Project, the Military Officers Association of America, the Association of the United States Army, the American Legion and the American Legion Auxiliary, the National Military Family Association, Blue Star Families, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, Paralyzed Veterans of America, the National Guard Association of the United States and many others. The Network will also connect caregivers to public and private expertise and resources available through programs such as the Veterans Affairs Caregiver Helpline, the Warrior Care Program, Military OneSource, Vets4Warriors, the National Resource Directory, Veteran Caregivers, Easter Seals and the Caregiver Action Network.

For over 20 years, TAPS has successfully provided support to over 50,000 survivors whose loved ones have died during their military service. Using its best practices of peer mentoring, online peer communities and community-based peer support groups, TAPS brings resources, hope and healing to families of the fallen 24/7/365 worldwide. This peer connectedness works because it offers those in need the opportunity to walk with someone who has gone, and come through, a similar grief journey.

The TAPS model of peer-based support will be applied to address the challenges identified in the RAND report, especially for those post 9/11 caregivers who are too often isolated in their own form of grieving over the loss of the health of their military loved one and the life they knew before. During the next 12 months, this Network will prepare master trainers, and trainers to ready 10,000 experienced caregivers for the role of peer mentor. Through these trained peers, online peer communities and community-based peer support groups, the Network will reach 50,000 caregivers who might otherwise remain alone with their challenges, isolated with their emotions and often hopeless in their circumstances.

TAPS is proud to offer its expertise to the Network and to work closely with its sister organizations to ensure that those who care for those who serve are supported where it’s most needed — in their communities — by those who know most what is needed — their peers.

Huffington Post

05/06/2014 11:16 am EDT

Updated: 07/06/2014 5:59 am EDT

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bonnie-carroll/military-caregiver-peer-network_b_5269619.html

 

 

Caregivers to Wounded Warriors are Hidden Heroes

Selfless helpers need support, too

Lynda C. Davis

“Meeting the other caregiver was like finding a twin with a secret language all our own,” said Andrea Sawyer, a fellow of the Elizabeth Dole Foundation’s Caring for Military Families project.

A mother of two, and wife and caregiver for her husband, who was medically retired from the Army in 2008, Ms. Sawyer captures the essence of connection that warrior caregivers seek. Knowing that they cannot quit, caregivers search for ways to share and “build each other up” she explains. Determined to do whatever it takes to save their loved one and their family, they are also deeply committed to ensure they never “leave another caregiver behind.”

This need for mutual support among caregivers is very practical, even lifesaving, when a wounded warrior must use extensive services of multiple agencies and providers. Beside hospital beds and waiting rooms, caregivers use trial and error to gain information about how best to navigate the maze of benefits and services.

Through sharing with others, they can come to view their warrior’s injuries and their own unexpected caregiver roles as “a detour on the journey of our lives, not as a derailment.”

The support of other caregivers “is fuel that keeps the train on the tracks” for Ms. Sawyer, it remains difficult to find for far too many. The challenges faced each day by caregivers who support those who served were highlighted in the recently released RAND Corp. report “Hidden Heroes, America’s Military Caregivers.” Commissioned by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation, the report estimates there are currently 5.5 million military caregivers in the United States, 1.1 million of whom care for a veteran who served since Sept. 11, 2001.

While all caregivers experience decline in personal health outcomes, greater strains in family relationships and more workplace problems than non-caregivers, these statistics were even higher for post-September 11 caregivers. The report concluded that these caregivers tended to be younger, caring for a younger veteran, and be less connected to a support network.

To address this need for connection, a group of military and veterans service organizations is creating a direct opportunity for caregivers to receive peer support. This effort, called the Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network, is part of the Elizabeth Dole Foundation National Coalition for Military Caregivers, highlighted by first lady Michelle Obama at a White House Joining Forces event on Friday.

This network will tap the shared experience of our nation’s hidden heroes — those who care for those who have worn the uniform — in order to rally community-based engagement. It will provide caregivers with more formal access to person-to-person, online and community-based peer-support opportunities that supplement governmental services, and it will do so for free.

The network is modeled on the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), which has successfully used peers to deliver comprehensive services and support for 20 years to more than 50,000 adults and children whose loved ones died during military service. The network is tapping into the expertise of a wide range of other nonprofit groups, such as the Wounded Warrior Project, which builds peer-to-peer support into their engagement opportunities to more than 50,000 alumni and caregivers. Initial partner organizations, including the Military Officers Association of America, the American Legion Auxiliary, the Association of the United States Army, the National Military Family Association, Blue Star Families, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, and the National Guard Association of the United States, will help structure the network to make the benefits of peer support available to caregivers of all eras.

The network will also connect caregivers to public and private expertise and resources available through programs such as the Veterans Affairs Caregiver Helpline, the Warrior Care Program, Military OneSource, Vets4Warriors, the National Resource Directory, Veteran Caregivers, Easter Seals and the Caregiver Action Network. Over the next 12 months, it will recruit, train and support a cadre of volunteer peer caregivers who can offer 50,000 contacts to help overcome any isolation, which often cripples the heart.

The not-so-secret language of peer support that breaks through isolation is useful when speaking about the day-to-day challenges faced by many. For the caregivers of those among the less than 1 percent of Americans who have served in the military, it is however, an essential common language to know to translate the sometimes fleeting signs of hopefulness needed to pass through the times of trial. Indeed, the language of military and veteran caregiver peer support is a sacred code that cannot be contracted or contrived, but must be lived to be learned.

The Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network will help ensure caregivers from all eras have access to others who share their noble love and dedication, who speak their common language of battle, of caring and of healing against all odds. Without this voice, without each other, caregivers all too often remain hidden heroes, left behind.

Lynda C. Davis is executive vice president of Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) and a former deputy undersecretary of defense for military community and family policy.

The Washington Times

Friday, April 11, 2014

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/apr/11/davis-hidden-heroes/

 

Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation Grants $552,500 to the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors for Development of Military and Veteran Caregiver Network

Funding will support the Military and Veteran Caregiver Network’s innovative Online Peer Support Community Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – November 5, 2014

ARLINGTON, VA – Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) will receive a $552,500 grant, courtesy of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, to support the development and launch of the Online Peer Support Community Program. This program, part of the newly built Military and Veteran Caregiver Network, will provide structured, digital social support for caregivers to help increase their sense of connectedness, engagement, and hopefulness while reducing their reported feelings of isolation.

The Online Peer Support Community will require more than 5,000 hours of programming in order to allow over 50,000 caregivers to quickly connect to others with similar life experiences for support, information and resources. Caregivers will benefit as both recipients and providers of peer support, sharing their experiences through social platforms including chats, forums and webinars.

“With the generous grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, TAPS will be able to connect thousands of these caregivers, without regard to location or time, to the proven benefits of peer support,” notes Dr. Lynda Davis, Caregiver Network Director and TAPS Executive Vice President.

The programs of the Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network (Caregiver Network) will provide the estimated 5.5 million caregivers of wounded, ill, or injured military service members and veterans with access to structured social services to help reduce their isolation by increasing their connectedness, engagement and access to resources.

“These caregivers, America’s hidden heroes, far too often find themselves isolated and alone in their caregiving duties, creating negative consequences for themselves and their families,” said Dr. Davis.

The Caregiver Network is facilitated by TAPS with the recognition of the White House Joining Forces Initiative and the Military Caregiver Coalition and the participation of hundreds of military and veteran service organizations nationwide.

TAPS is modeling the Caregiver Network on its 20 years of experience in the successful delivery of evidence-based, best practices in peer support services to over 50,000 military family survivors.

“TAPS is honored to be able to disseminate our 20 years of best practices in the delivery of peer-based emotional support to military family survivors to caregivers of the wounded, ill and injured who support those who have given so much in service to this country,” said president and founder Bonnie Carroll.

The grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation is a part of the Foundation’s Mental Health & Well-Being initiative, which recently granted $2 million collectively to three veteran service organizations, including the grant to TAPS.

About TAPS

The Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors is the national organization providing compassionate care for the families of America’s fallen military heroes and has offered support to more than 50,000 surviving family members of our fallen military and their caregivers since 1994. TAPS provides peer-based emotional support, grief and trauma resources, grief seminars and retreats for adults, Good Grief Camps for children, case work assistance, connections to community-based care, online and in-person support groups and a 24/7 resource and information helpline for all who have been affected by a death in the Armed Forces. Services are provided free of charge. For more information go to www.taps.org or call the toll-free TAPS resource and information helpline at 1.800.959.TAPS (8277).

About the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation

The mission of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation is to promote health equity and improve the health outcomes of populations disproportionately affected by serious diseases and health conditions. The Foundation’s Mental Health & Well-Being initiative in the U.S. focuses funding on addressing the mental health and reintegration needs of returning service members, veterans and their families. For more information about the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, please visit www.bms.com/foundation.

Media Contact: Lynda Davis

lynda.davis@taps.org

202-588-TAPS

 

 

Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) Receives Grant from Wounded Warrior Project

Arlington, VA – Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) has received a grant in the amount of $250,000 from Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP), a nonprofit veteran service organization whose mission is to honor and empower Wounded Warriors. The grant will enable TAPS to disseminate its proven model of peer support to the caregivers of wounded, ill and injured service members and veterans nationwide.

The Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network (Caregiver Network) will provide the estimated 5.5 million caregivers of wounded, ill, or injured military and veterans with access to structured social services to help reduce their isolation by increasing their connectedness, engagement and access to information on resources. The Caregiver Network is facilitated by the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) with the recognition of the White House Joining Forces Initiative and the Military Caregiver Coalition and the participation of hundreds of military and veteran service organizations nationwide.

TAPS is modeling the Caregiver Network on its 20 years of experience in the successful delivery of evidence-based, best practices in peer support services to over 50,000 military families; many of them previous caregivers, who have lost a loved during their service in the Armed Forces. The grant from the Wounded Warrior Project will enable the TAPS’ model of peer mentor support to be delivered by partners to the caregivers of veterans who are often at greater risk for isolation.

“TAPS is honored to be able to offer our proven-approach to peer-based emotional support to caregivers who support those who have given so much in service to this country,” TAPS President and Founder Bonnie Carroll said. “These caregivers, America’s hidden heroes, far too often find themselves isolated and alone in their caregiving duties creating negative consequences for themselves and their families. With the generous grant from the Wounded Warrior Project, TAPS will be able to unify hundreds of organizations nationwide to offer these caregivers the benefit of peer mentor support.”

“The WWP Grant Program allows us to collectively broaden the network of support and services that are available to injured service members,” said Steve Nardizzi, CEO, Wounded Warrior Project. “Supporting these excellent organizations that share our mission and core values will help us ensure that this generation of injured service members is the most successful and well-adjusted in our nation’s history.”

In this third year of operation, the WWP Grant Program continues to work with organizations that provide injured service members with unique, specialized programs and services, often in remote or underserved areas of the country. During two review cycles each year, WWP carefully selects the grant recipients, and to date has provided support to over 85 organizations nationwide.

It is estimated over 50,000 servicemen and women have been physically injured in recent military conflicts, another 320,000 have experienced a traumatic brain injury while on deployment, and as many as 400,000 additional service members live with the invisible wounds of war including combat-related stress, major depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

For more information, and a description of the grant recipients, please visit 2014 WWP Grant Program.

# # #

About TAPS

The Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) is the national organization providing compassionate care for the families of America’s fallen military heroes. TAPS provides peer-based emotional support, grief and trauma resources, seminars and retreats for adults, Good Grief Camps for children, case work assistance, connections to community-based care, online and in-person care groups, and a 24/7 resource and National Military Survivor Helpline for all who have been affected by a death in the Armed Forces. Services are provided free of charge. TAPS has offered support to more than 50,000 surviving family members of our fallen military and their caregivers since 1994. For more information go to www.taps.org or call the toll-free help line at 1.800.959.TAPS (8277).

About Wounded Warrior Project

Wounded Warrior Project is recognizing its ten-year anniversary, reflecting on a decade of service and reaffirming its commitment to serving injured veterans for their lifetime. The mission of Wounded Warrior Project is to honor and empower Wounded Warriors. WWP currently serves over 56,000 warriors and nearly 8,000 family members through its 20 unique programs and services. The purpose of WWP is to raise awareness and to enlist the public’s aid for the needs of injured service members, to help injured servicemen and women aid and assist each other, and to provide unique, direct programs and services to meet their needs. WWP is a national organization headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida. To get involved and learn more, visit woundedwarriorproject.org.

 

Media Contact

Media seeking to talk with TAPS may contact Lynda Davis, lynda.davis@taps.org or at 202-588-TAPS.

 

Bob Woodruff Foundation invests more than $5M to help injured service members, veterans and their families in 2014.

New York, NY (PRWEB) — December 22, 2014 The Bob Woodruff Foundation will close out 2014 stronger than ever, having invested more than $5 million in programs and organizations serving post-9/11 injured service members, veterans and their families.

This includes $1.3 million in grants announced today for nearly a dozen nonprofits, helping with: veteran entrepreneurship; community impact; vocational training; transportation; caregiver peer-support; nursing scholarships; and life-coaches for severely injured veterans.

“The needs of those injured in combat will last long after the wars are over,” said Anne Marie Dougherty, executive director of the Bob Woodruff Foundation. “We are extremely grateful for the support received over this past year, which positions us well to continue our efforts to find, fund and shape innovative programs that meet the needs of our injured veterans and their families.”

Overall, 34 organizations received financial grants from the Bob Woodruff Foundation throughout the year.

The year was kicked-off by a $1 million donation from the PepsiCo Foundation to support a nationwide “Veterans Helping Veterans” initiative, to help service men and women reconnect with their communities while continuing to serve their fellow troops.

For example, grants to the Mission Continues and Team Red, White and Blue helped both organizations develop leadership training. Warrior Canine Connection received support to help veterans recover from their own wounds, by training service dogs for fellow injured veterans.

Much of the organization’s support came from the 8th Annual Stand Up for Heroes, in partnership with the New York Comedy Festival, which raised a record-breaking $6 million while using comedy and music to raise awareness. It did so thanks to the support of several sponsors, including Veterans on Wall Street, the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation, and founding sponsor GFI Group, Inc.

Additionally, the first-ever Dine Out for Heroes enlisted the culinary talents of nearly 200 New York restaurants which donated $1 for every customer served the day of Stand Up for Heroes. The event was spearheaded by Caroline Hirsch, Andrew Fox, and Peter and Penny Glazier, founders of the Glazier Group of restaurants, which includes Michael Jordan’s The Steak House NYC in Grand Central Terminal.

Beyond grants, the Bob Woodruff Foundation supported several events including the annual Warrior Games in Colorado, and first-ever Invictus Games in London. Hosted by Prince Harry, Invictus brought together injured and ill athletes, from 13 nations, to compete in adaptive sports and demonstrate that their wounds do not define them.

The Bob Woodruff Foundation also held two, High Impact Collaboration™ Series convenings, designed to spotlight leading-edge advances in select fields and to generate strategic partnerships among government, military, nonprofit and corporate stakeholders.

The most recent, Intimacy After Injury, explored issues relating to combat injuries on sexual health, intimacy and fertility. It was held this month in partnership with the Johns Hopkins Military & Veterans Health Institute, and the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine. A report will be issued in January.

In June, A New Role for Man’s Best Friend, brought experts together to discuss the role service dogs can play to help treat psychological wounds Its findings can be found on the foundation’s website.

“We know that there is not a one-size fits all solution to help post-9/11 veterans and families,” said Dougherty. “We have honed the ability to cut through the noise, to become a model for success.”

In doing so, the Bob Woodruff Foundation has emerged as a leader in the veteran space, as evidenced by the growing support of corporate leaders like Veterans on Wall Street, a consortium of financial firms. Bob Woodruff was a featured speaker at their annual conference.

The foundation was also recognized as one of the featured nonprofits at the historic Concert for Valor, hosted by HBO, Starbucks and Chase, on Veterans Day.

Since 2006, the Bob Woodruff Foundation has invested more than $25 million in finding and funding programs across the country. It has reached more than 2 million injured service members, veterans and their families in three key areas: Education and Employment; Rehabilitation and Recovery; and Quality of Life. Learn more about the Bob Woodruff Foundation’s impact online at http://www.BobWoodruffFoundation.org.

Grants announced today:

Education and Employment:

Farmer Veteran Coalition

National Farmer Veteran Stakeholders Conference

Geographic Reach: National

The National Farmer Veteran Stakeholders Conference was the first ever attempt to bring together 200 individual and organizational stakeholders, from 40 states, to find veterans career opportunities and healing spaces on American farms. The event increases coordination and collaboration between agricultural and veteran service providers; provides educational workshops on assistance to farmer veterans; and facilitates potential policy proposals.

Four Block

Veteran Career Development Program

Geographic Reach: New York & Seattle

The Four Block Career Development Program provides transitioning post-9/11 enlisted service members with the essential tools to obtain competitive internships and full-time positions at companies or organizations that match their interests, attributes and strengths. The Bob Woodruff Foundation grant will enable Four Block to invest in their program directors, allowing them to continue to provide a meaningful and supportive program to transitioning veterans in New York City and Seattle.

Home Builders Institute (HBI)

Pre-Apprenticeship Certificate Training (PACT)

Geographic Reach: Fort Stewart, Ga.

HBI, the national leader for career training in the building industry, will offer its award-winning Pre-Apprenticeship Certificate Training (PACT) to soon-to-transition active duty military serving at the U.S. Army Garrison at Fort Stewart, GA and to unemployed and under-employed veteran populations in the Greater Savannah area. HBI students will learn marketable skills through classroom instruction, and real work experience on community service construction projects. The “open entry, skilled exit” program takes an average of 12 weeks to complete.

Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF)

2014 EBV Business Startup Grants – National Conference

Geographic Reach: National

While EBV is able to leverage alumni, as well as in kind support for services such as marketing and legal advice, access to start-up capital is an obstacle. Through the “Bob Woodruff Foundation Business Startup Grant,” graduates will submit a completed business plan, and a panel will select the top ten. These veterans will pitch their plan at the annual EBV National Alumni and Training Conference. Grants will be awarded to the top three pitches as well as three specialty categories: the business with the potential to have the greatest social impact on veterans and their families; best social venture; and best technology venture.

Worklife Institute

Texas Veterans Transition Program

Geographic Reach: Texas

Now in its 7th year, the Texas Veterans Transition Program’s goal is to empower veterans and their families to attain and sustain robust and satisfying vocational, family and civic lives. It aids in transition with supportive services such as personal and family counseling, and legal and financial advising, to promote upward sustainability. The program’s expansion this next year will emphasize targeted vocational programs with recognized certifications, as well as onboarding services with cooperating companies, and an entrepreneurship program specifically designed to support veterans as they start their own business ventures.

100 Entrepreneurs Foundation, Inc.

Operation Sustainability

Geographic Reach: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center & Fort Belvoir

100 Entrepreneurs Foundation’s mission is to expand the employment horizons of wounded and transitioning service members and their families. 100 Entrepreneurs holds classes in the hospital, followed by mentorship, focused on entrepreneurship, industry, and business functions. This helps participants build their own businesses or find a meaningful career in the industry of their choice.

Rehabilitation and Recovery:

Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare

Veterans Healthcare Scholar Program

Geographic Reach: National

The Jonas Veterans Healthcare Scholar Program supports nurses who are obtaining advanced degrees (Ph. D. and DNP) focused on the healthcare needs of veterans. The work of these scholars—175 in 35 states to date — will improve the care and understanding of both veterans and their families. The Jonas Center’s overall methodology in this program is to “train the trainer,” creating a series of concentric circles around each advanced practice nurse, that will spread their expertise to thousands of patients, healthcare workers and future nurses.

Shepherd Center

SHARE Military Initiative

Geographic Reach: Atlanta

The SHARE Military Initiative provides a comprehensive continuum of care, specifically tailored to meet the needs of each client; this includes complimentary housing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, vocational therapy, speech therapy, therapeutic recreation and legal, financial and psychological counseling, among other programs. With the support of the Bob Woodruff Foundation, SHARE is able to provide a life coach to work with each of their military patients, both while receiving treatment at the Shepherd Center and once they transition back to their homes, families and communities.

Quality of Life:

The Mission Continues

Service Platoon Summit

Geographic Reach: National

The Mission Continues empowers veterans who face the challenge of adjusting to life at home to find new missions by deploy their skills and leadership in meaningful ways within their communities. This Bob Woodruff Foundation grant made it possible to bring together the leaders of Service Platoons to capture best practices, and develop case studies that will be shared with new Platoon Leaders and Squad Leaders through training and ongoing support in the upcoming year.

Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS)

Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network:

Community-based Peer Support Group Program

Geographic Reach: National

Based on the successful model of evidence-based peer support used by the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) to assist families of the fallen for over 20 years, the Military and Veteran Caregiver Peer Support Network will help address the high rate of isolation experienced among the 1.1 million caregivers of post-9/11 injured veterans. The Bob Woodruff Foundation grant will enable the Network to create and disseminate training modules and protocols to support the Community-based Peer Support Group Program in ten pilot communities. These pilot groups will be evaluated for their impact on caregivers’ sense of connectedness, engagement and hopefulness.

About the Bob Woodruff Foundation:

The Bob Woodruff Foundation (BWF) is the nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring injured service members and their families are thriving long after they return home. A national organization with grassroots reach, the Bob Woodruff Foundation complements the work of the federal government —diligently navigating the maze of more than 46,000 nonprofits providing services to veterans—finds, funds and shapes innovative programs, and holds them accountable for results. To date, BWF has invested more than $25 million in public education and solutions, reaching more than 2 million service members, support personnel, veterans and their families. The Bob Woodruff Foundation was co-founded in 2006 by award-winning anchor Bob Woodruff and his family, whose own experiences inspired them to help make sure the nation’s heroes have access to the high level of support and resources they deserve, for as long as they need it. For more information about the Bob Woodruff Foundation, please visit bobwoodrufffoundation.org.

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